• Stambh Organization

Female Genital mutilation by UTKARSH (NLIU, BHOPAL)

Female Genital mutilation (hereinafter FGM) is the removal of a part of or the entire genital from the body. It is a very old practice that is prevalent all over the world that varies from society to society. It is also known by different terms like circumcision or genital cutting etc. most it is done through elective surgery that it need to schedule in advance as it does not involves medical emergency. The surgery can be performed on an infant baby till another stage of life. In certain Cultural, the Religious and non-therapeutic where it is accepted norms are being practised by all religious beliefs and others. It is generally performed either by traditional practitioners without anaesthetic or medical practitioners.

LEGAL ASPECT OF FGM

According to article 2[1] which says:

“Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour and sex.”

According to Article 1[2] which prevent any forms of discrimination against women as:

“Any distinction, exclusion or restriction made on the basis of sex which has the effect or purpose of impairing or nullifying the recognition, enjoyment or exercise by women, irrespective of their marital status, on a basis of equality of men and women, of human rights and fundamental freedoms in the political, economic, social, cultural, civil or any other field.”



RECENT NEWS/DEVELOPMENTS PERTAINING TO FGM LAWS

SUDAN BANS FEMALE GENITAL MUTILATION, UNICEF VOWS TO HELP SUPPORT NEW LAW[3].

- The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) welcomed the landmark move by Sudan’s transitional government this week to criminalize female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C), with a three-year jail sentence for offenders.

FEMALE GENITAL MUTILATION COSTS $1.4 BILLION ANNUALLY: UN HEALTH AGENCY[4].

- Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) poses serious risks to the health and well-being of women and girls, but it also exacts a crippling economic toll, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

FROM THE FIELD: ‘A PIECE OF ME’ WAS TAKEN[5].

- “My flesh has been taken away, but I can never give away my heart”; those are the powerful words of resolve from Abida Dawud, one of three women survivors of female genital mutilation, or FGM, from Ethiopia, who have been speaking to the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) about their experiences.

VOLUNTEER MAPPING PROJECT HAS SAVED 3000 GIRLS FROM FGM IN TANZANIA[6].

- Some 3,000 Tanzanian girls have escaped female genital mutilation (FGM) in five years after using a volunteer-created mapping project, a British-Tanzanian charity has said.

DAWOODI BOHRA PRACTICE OF KHAFZ HAS BEEN WRONGLY LABELLED AS FEMALE GENITAL MUTILATION BY THOSE WITH AN AGENDA[7].

- Amid allegations that Dawoodi Bohra women are oppressed, mute spectators of a patriarchal system, we — the Dawoodi Bohra Women’s Association for Religious Freedom (DBWRF) comprising over 72,000 practicing Dawoodi Bohra women — would like to set the record straight about our practices and the community, in light of International Day of Zero Tolerance for FGM (female genital mutilation).

FEMALE GENITAL MUTILATION HAS DECLINED GLOBALLY, BUT DAWOODI BOHRA WOMEN CONTINUE TO FIGHT 'KHATNA' IN INDIA[8].

- International Day of Zero Tolerance For Female Genital Mutilation: In India, FGM in the form of 'khatna' is strongly associated with the Dawoodi Bohra community


[1] Universal declaration of human rights, 1948. [2] Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), 1979 [3] UNICEF/Kate Holt [4] Sara Elgamal for UNFPA [5] Sara Elgamal for UNFPA [6] https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/africa/tanzania-female-genital-mutilation-crowd2map-b1645295.html [7] https://www.firstpost.com/tag/female-genital-mutilation [8] Ibid.

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